Archival Prints

2012

2020. Pigment ink on 300 gsm matte archival paper (100% cotton). Edition of 10.

Available Stock: 7
SKU: CA03365
Php 2,800.00

Description

“Typhoon Bopha, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Pablo, was the strongest tropical cyclone on record to ever affect the southern Filipino island of Mindanao, making landfall as a Category 5 super typhoon with winds of 175 mph (280 km/h). The twenty-fourth tropical storm, along with being the fourth and final super typhoon of the 2012 Pacific Typhoon season, Bopha originated unusually close to the equator, becoming the second-most southerly Category 5 super typhoon.

After the first landfalling in Palau, where it destroyed houses, disrupted communications, and caused power outages, flooding, and uprooted trees, Bopha made landfall late on December 3 on Mindanao. The storm caused widespread destruction on Mindanao, leaving thousands of people homeless and killing 1901 people.”

This print comes signed and numbered by the artist, with a signed Certificate of Authenticity (CoA).

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“Typhoon Bopha, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Pablo, was the strongest tropical cyclone on record to ever affect the southern Filipino island of Mindanao, making landfall as a Category 5 super typhoon with winds of 175 mph (280 km/h). The twenty-fourth tropical storm, along with being the fourth and final super typhoon of the 2012 Pacific Typhoon season, Bopha originated unusually close to the equator, becoming the second-most southerly Category 5 super typhoon.

 

After the first landfalling in Palau, where it destroyed houses, disrupted communications, and caused power outages, flooding, and uprooted trees, Bopha made landfall late on December 3 on Mindanao. The storm caused widespread destruction on Mindanao, leaving thousands of people homeless and killing 1901 people.”